International Journal of Environmental Sciences

Volume 2 Issue 3 2012           Pages: 1211- 1222

Morphophysiological responses of Alnus subcordata (L.) seedlings to permanent flooding and partial submersion

Author Information:

Ehsan Ghanbary- Faculty of Natural Resources and Marine Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Iran

Masoud Tabari - Faculty of Natural Resources and Marine Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Iran

Eduardo González - Université de Toulouse. UPS, INP. EcoLab (Laboratoire d’Écologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement). 118 route de Narbonne Bâtiment 4R1 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France and CNRS. EcoLab (Laboratoire d’Écologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement). 118 route de Narbonne Bâtiment 4R1 31062 Toulouse Cedex 9, France

Mehrdad Zarafshar - Faculty of Natural Resources and Marine Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Iran

ABSTRACT
Alnus subcordata (L.), the Caucasian alder,is a pioneer riparian tree native in riparian zones and wetlands of the Middle East region of Asia. In the Hyrcanian forest of North Iran, one of the most valuable forest communities in this world region, the use of this species through afforestation practices is being considered to restore the forest cover in extensive wetland areas that have been recently altered by a significant increase in the duration of their waterlogged conditions. To assess restorers, the morphophysiological responses to flooding stress of A. subcordata were investigated during a 120-day exsitu experiment. Forty-eight one year-old seedlings were subjected to three flooding treatments: 1) unflooded; 2) permanently flooded (i.e., 3 cm of flooding depth); and 3) partially submersed (i.e., 15 cm of flooding depth). Although survival of seedlings at the end of the experiment was almost complete, plants subjected to the two flooding stress treatments had a significantly lower growth. Other responses to flooding included the formation of hypertrophied lenticels and adventitious roots and a surprising higher allocation of biomass in roots. However, free proline concentration in leaves and roots was not affected by flooding. Overall, the results showed that A. subcordata is able to withstand long periods of waterlogged conditions by readjusting some morphological and physiological parameters.

Keywords : Adventitious roots, Caucasian alder. leaf area, proline, restoration, riparian tree

DOI: 10.6088/ijes.00202030008


© 2012 Copyright Ehsan Ghanbary et al, licensee IPA.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (2.0) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The electronic version of the article can be downloaded below.

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