International Journal of Environmental Sciences

Volume 2 Issue 4 2012           Pages:1873- 1888

Assessment of soil-atmosphere exchange of green house gases and their environmental factors in tropical dry deciduous forest and eucalyptus plantation at central Gujarat, Western India

Author Information:

Nirmal Kumar J.I  P.G. Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Institute of Science and Technology for Advanced Studies and Research (ISTAR), Vallabh Vidyanagar- 388 120, Gujarat, India

Patel Kanti  P.G. Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Institute of Science and Technology for Advanced Studies and Research (ISTAR), Vallabh Vidyanagar- 388 120, Gujarat, India

Rita N Kumar Department of Bioscience and Environmental Science, N.V. Patel college of Pure and Applied Sciences, Vallabh Vidyanagar - 388 120, Gujarat, India

Priyakanchini Gupta Department of Bioscience and Environmental Science, N.V. Patel college of Pure and Applied Sciences, Vallabh Vidyanagar - 388 120, Gujarat, India

ABSTRACT

The effects of land use and land use change on soil green house gas (GHG) fluxes are concerned due to Kyoto protocol requirement. Carbon dioxide, CH4 and N2O fluxes, emission and global warming potential from soil under a tropical dry deciduous forest and Eucalyptus plantation at Mogari, central Gujarat, Western India were measured for three months (February- April, 2011) at fifteen days intervals using closed static chamber technique and gas chromatography method.  However, little information is known about the effects of natural forest and plantation on soil-atmosphere greenhouse gas (GHG) exchanges. The mean soil N2O and CO2 emissions in the Eucalyptus plantation (EP) recorded were 0.18 mg N m−2h−1 and 5.81 mg C m−2h−1 whereas in dry deciduous forest the values were 0.15 mg N m−2h−1 and 6.52 mg C m−2h−1 respectively. The Eucalyptus plantation soil had lower mean CH4 uptake (-0.024 mg C m−2h−1) than the dry deciduous forest soils (-0.020 mg C m−2h−1). Variations in soil N2O emissions among the sites could be primarily explained by differences in mean WFPS and soil total N stock. Differences in soil CH4 uptake among the sites could be mostly attributed to differences in mean WFPS. The C : N ratio of soil could largely account for variations in soil CO2 emissions among the sites. This study reveals the potential values of GHGs in forest ecosystems.

Keywords: GHG flux, dry deciduous forest, eucalyptus plantation, Soil moisture, Soil temperature

DOI: 10.6088/ijes.00202030070


© 2012 Copyright Nirmal Kumar J.I et al, licensee IPA.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (2.0) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The electronic version of the article can be downloaded below.

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